Issue Papers

Issue Papers - IP12 - December 1999

This issue paper is a summary of the recent scientific developments that underpin modern biotechnology and a discussion of the potential risks and benefits when these are applied to agricultural crops. This introductory paper is intended for a general audience. Released at the Third Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organization in Seattle, December 2, 1999. Authors: Gabrielle J. Persley, The World Bank, Washington, D.C., and James N. Siedow, Department of Botany, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. IP12, December 1999, 8 pp., FREE. Available online (www.cast-science.org) AND in print (515-292-2125; fee for shipping/handling).

 
 
Issue Papers - IP11 - March 1999

Scientists discuss the risks associated with sudden loss of pesticides due to the implementation of the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 (FQPA) and suggest possible solutions. Chair: Mark E. Whalon, Center for Integrated Plant Systems, Michigan State University, East Lansing. IP11, March 1999, 14 pp., FREE. Available online (www.cast-science.org) AND in print (515-292-2125; fee for shipping/handling).

 
 
Issue Papers - IP10 - October 1998

A panel of five members of the National Academy of Sciences formed by CAST examine the scientific merits of the Biotechnology Industry Organization response to the major conclusions reached by eleven professional scientific societies on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposal to regulate genes which make plants resistant to pests by means of genetic engineering under the same regulations developed for use of chemical pesticides applied to plants. Chair: Eugene Nester, Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle. IP10, October 1998, 8 pp., FREE. Available online (www.cast-science.org) AND in print (515-292-2125; fee for shipping/handling).

 
 
Issue Papers - IP 9 - August 1998

Discussion of the feasibility of applying the medical model of prescriptions to high-risk pesticides that are being reassessed following passage by Congress of the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) in 1996. Chair: Harold D. Coble, Department of Crop Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh. IP9, August 1998, 10 pp., FREE. Available online (www.cast-science.org) AND in print (515-292-2125; fee for shipping/handling).

 
 
Issue Papers - IP 8 - November 1997

The scientific evidence does not support restrictions in the consumption of salted, smoked, or nitrite-preserved foods by the U.S. population. Chair: Michael W. Pariza, Food Research Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison. IP8, November 1997, 8 pp., FREE . Available online (www.cast-science.org) AND in print (515-292-2125; fee for shipping/handling).

 
 
Issue Papers - IP 7 - April 1996

Foodborne bacteria cause as many as 9,000 deaths in the United States annually; yet scientifically proven safe, low doses of pasteurizing radiation can kill over 99% of most foodborne bacteria. Radiation pasteurization safely controls foodborne pathogens on beef, pork, lamb, and seafood. Long-term animal feeding studies have demonstrated that radiation pasteurized or sterilized foods are safe and nutritious for humans.The process has been endorsed by the U.S. FDA, the USDA, the World Health Organization, the health authorities of 40 countries, and many other associations.Cochairs: Donald W. Thayer, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania, and Edward S. Josephson, University of Rhode Island, West Kingston. IP7, April 1996, 10 pp., FREE. Available online (www.cast-science.org) AND in print (515-292-2125; fee for shipping/handling).

 
 
Issue Papers - IP 6 - February 1996

For more than a century, crop price instability has dogged U.S. farmers. And in the past 60 years--despite federal subsidy and acreage reduction programs meant to stabilize farm income--farm numbers, farm populations, and rural prosperity have declined ominously. Public concerns over food safety, commodity program costs, and agricultural sustainability have become important policy issues.Restriction of research funding and crop support payments to major commodity crops has undermined the potential of new crops to alleviate related concerns and pressures.The search for and development of new crops is critical to U.S. agriculture and would improve its sustainability through diversification. Chair: Jules Janick, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. IP6, February 1996, 12 pp., FREE. Available online (www.cast-science.org) AND in print (515-292-2125; fee for shipping/handling).

 
 
Issue Papers - IP 5 - November 1994

Agricultural, corporate, scientific, political, environmental, and social communities are asking the agricultural research sytem to identify and pursue a broadened range of research priorities. Chair: James R. Fischer, South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. IP5, November 1994, 12 pp., FREE. Available online (www.cast-science.org) AND in print (515-292-2125; fee for shipping/handling).

 
 
Issue Papers - IP 4 - July 1994

Review of scientific evidence in response to proposed U.S. Food and Drug Administration policy for labeling of foods from new plant varieties. Chair: Susan F. Barefoot, Department of Food Science, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. IP4, July 1994, 8 pp. OUT OF PRINT, Available as download only.

 
 
Issue Papers - IP 3 - June 1994

Scientists found no evidence that supplemental selenium use for farm animals and poultry, including feedlot concentrations, was involved in any environmental problems. Chair: James E. Oldfield, Department of Animal Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis. IP3, June 1994, 6 pp., FREE. Available online (www.cast-science.org) AND in print (515-292-2125; fee for shipping/handling).